Women, and men from ethnic minority groups, would have extra incomes totalling an extra £127 billion a year, or £9,300 each, if they matched those of White British men according to new analysis from the London School of Economics.

The total breaks down as follows:

Click on the images to reveal the total amount of lost income for minority group

 

£500m

In total for

Indian Men

 

Indian Man

 

£1.9b

In total for

Pakistani Men

 

Pakistani Man

 

£800m

In total for

Bangladeshi Men

 

Bangladeshi Man

 

£400m

In total for

Black Caribbean Men

 

Black Caribbean Man

 

£1b

In total for

Black African Men

 

Black African Man

 

Less than

£50m

In total for

Chinese Men

 

Chinese Man

 

£100m

In total for

Other Men

 

Other Man

 

£3.1b

In total for

Indian Women

 

Indian Woman

 

£1.2b

In total for

Pakistani Women

 

Pakistani Woman

 

£600m

In total for

Bangladeshi Women

 

Bangladeshi Woman

 

£900m

In total for

Black Caribbean

Women

 

Black Caribbean Woman

 

£1.6b

In total for

Black African

 women

 

Black African Woman

 

£400m

In total for

Chinese women

 

Chinese Woman

 

£11.7b

In total for

Other women

 

Other Woman

 

£103.1b

In total for

White UK women

 

White UK Woman

Income gaps (£ per week) (vs White UK men at £676.8/week)

Men

Women

White UK

Indian

Pakistani

Bangladeshi

Black Caribbean

Black African

Chinese

Other groups

N/A

25.6

177.9

206.9

72.2

103.8

17.5

1.1

210.8

185.5

260.8

265.4

148.8

177.7

158

188.3

Income Gaps (£ per year) vs White UK men at £35,193.6p/year

Men

Women

White UK

Indian

Pakistani

Bangladeshi

Black Caribbean

Black African

Chinese

Other groups

N/A

1331.2

9250.8

10758.8

3754.4

5397.6

910

57.2

10961.6

9646

13561.6

13800.8

7737.6

9240.4

8216

9791.6

The figures are for income gaps compared to White British men.  Differences reflect qualifications and occupation etc. but also actual rates of employment, as well as differences in other sources of income (which only make up a small share of incomes of this group).  Gaps would be bigger for many if those who were out of the labour market for caring responsibilities or disability were included, but are not counted as economically active.  Some of the differences will reflect differences in qualifications, but working age White British men do not now have lower levels of qualifications than most of the other groups [can give reference, if needed]. Previous research suggests that pay differences persist even when educational qualifications and occupation are controlled, with ‘pay penalties’ allowing for these of a similar scale to the pay gaps seen before allowing for them.  For younger adults, with higher levels of qualifications, the penalties are even larger.

The figures are based on analysis by the International Inequalities Institute and Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics, comparing the incomes that economically active adults in Great Britain (aged 16-59) received in their own right beIn total fore tax during the years 2009/10 to 2014/15 (using data from the Family Resources Survey) by gender and ethnicity , and converted to 2014 prices. The analysis uses results which update work originally published Nandi, A. and Platt, L. (2010) Ethnic Minority Women’s Poverty and Economic Well-Being. London: Government Equalities Office. See also E. Karagiannaki and L Platt (2015), The changing distribution of individual incomes  beIn total fore and after the recession http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/casepaper192.pdf

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